Georgia Mountains Unitarian Universalist Church & Nacoochee Presbyterian Church Reflect on their Four Directions Fund Grant

In Fall 2017, GIPL was pleased to provide a seed grant through our Four Directions Fund to a collaborative project between Georgia Mountains Unitarian Universalist Church and Nacoochee Presbyterian Church. One of ten grant recipients, this funding went towards a Reforestation Project in Espumpuja, Guatemala.   Continue reading

Fossil Free PCUSA Seeks Forward Movement After Defeat Of Fossil Fuel Divestment Proposal

For Immediate Release – June 22, 2018

Contact: rev. abby mohaupt, awmohaupt@gmail.com; Rev. Emily Brewer 929-251-3277 emily@presbypeacefellowship.org

A proposal to fully divest the denomination’s foundation and pension accounts from all fossil fuel companies failed in the Presbyterian Church (USA)’s General Assembly Friday. Fossil Free PCUSA, a project of Presbyterian Peace Fellowship (PPF), led the advocacy effort on behalf of divestment, and their work included a two-week, 212 mile walk from Louisville, KY to St. Louis, Missouri. Forty presbyteries signed onto the overture in advance of the assembly, the greatest number of presbyteries to ever concur on an overture. After four hours of discussion, the assembly voted 332 to 178 against divestment. Continue reading

Solarize Atlanta Crowdsourcing To Bring Down Solar Costs

Ruth and Larry Menter turned to Solarize Atlanta to bring down the cost of their residential solar project. Its 20 panels and high-capacity battery mean they can actually sell energy back to their electric utility company.
CREDIT JIM BURRESS / WABE

Buying a lot of something all at once is usually cheaper than buying the same thing in smaller amounts over time — a concept known as “economy of scale.”

Now, some solar advocates in Atlanta are bringing the principle to a rooftop near you, and, in the process, bringing down the cost of installing a residential solar system. Continue reading

What Happens during an Energy Audit?

Today’s blog post comes from GIPL friend Patrick Cobb, the Facilities Manager at Saint Anne’s Episcopal Church.  Here he reflects on the process of receiving an Energy Audit from GIPL and what changes have been put in place following the audit. Additionally, Saint Anne’s has a large solar array installed on the parish, funded through a GIPL grant, which powers their administrative offices.    Continue reading

Meet Our Programs & Events Summer Intern: Courtney Godwin

My name is Courtney Godwin, and I am a Religion and Social Justice major about to begin my third year at Agnes Scott College. Growing up, I spent much of my time outdoors, whether it was in the backyard with my sister or camping and hiking with my family. My parents both inspired a love of nature in me from an early age which has stayed with me. This zeal for nature was a catalyst for my minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies. Continue reading

Georgia Mountain Unitarian Universalist Church Reflects on Their Four Directions Fund Grant

In 2017, GIPL was pleased to provide a seed grant through our Four Directions Fund to Georgia Mountain Unitarian Universalist Church. One of ten grant recipients, Georgia Mountain UUC has a vibrant Green ministry that engages people within and beyond the four walls of the church.  This past year, the congregation collaborated with several local organizations to tackle an environmental issue close to their hearts.   Continue reading

Sightings from the Treehouse: Thomas Berry’s Universe

Photo courtesy of Chris Donaghue

When I first discovered Thomas Berry, world religion scholar and renowned author, my eyes opened wide as I felt a void being filled. Over the past 50 years, scientific findings about the creation of the universe, earth, life and consciousness have provided answers about our origins. Thomas Berry’s work culminated in the call for a new creation story, one based on scientific fact and not just faith. He urges us to move from a scientific-technological focus to one based on ecological principles; one founded on recognizing the intrinsic value of nature. The whole planet is one complex ecosystem all working in harmony and self-supporting, thus enabling the earth to maintain conditions suitable for life and its evolution. James Lovelock calls this the Gaia Theory.   Everything is interconnected. Berry felt the old creation story for Christians, Genesis, served its purpose through history, but new scientific discoveries beg for a new creation story. Continue reading

Meet Our Summer Solar Wise Coordinator: Intern Maddie Cox

Forming a relationship with GIPL has become a solid ground in introducing me to the importance and practice of Creation Care. With the mission to partner with religious congregations becoming more sustainable in their practices and use of resources, GIPL offers a great understanding in what it means to engage God’s people in the importance of going green! Being fresh out of college, this is an area of ministry I aspire to follow in my vocational calling.

With a family background involved in the National Park Service and the Environmental Protection Agency, I adopted a passion for environmentalism at a young age. Thus, when it came time to consider what I wanted to be ‘when I grow up,’ I favored the idea of sustainable development as a career path and chose to attend Georgia Southern University for their leading, awarded efforts in sustainability. Continue reading

Holy Comforter Episcopal Church Receives a GIPL Energy Efficiency Grant to Upgrade Lighting to LED

Holy Comforter Episcopal Church has been a GIPL partner for over a decade, and received a pre-Power Wise energy audit in November 2007.   The audit was conducted by Shane Totten of Southface and Woody Bartlett, GIPL co-founder.  They were a former recipient of the GIPPY Trailblazer award.  Holy Comforter applied for their first GIPL matching grant in 2009 and received $1,134 to upgrade T-12 fluorescent lights in the Parish Hall to T-5 fluorescents.  This year, they applied for funding to upgrade their sanctuary lighting from 200 watt incandescent lights to 7 watt LED.  The incandescent lights cost $770 annually to operate while the LED cost $32 annually.  In addition, they will upgrade all their exit signs to LED.    The grants committee recognized the merits of their grant application.  The committee awarded Holy Comforter Episcopal Church $4,432 to help fund these energy conservation measures from their energy audit. Continue reading